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Frequently Asked Questions

What is an IQ?
How does a child qualify for SPED?
What is Specified Learning Disability (SLD?)
What tests will typically be administered by the school psychologist?

What is an IQ?
An IQ is an acronym for “Intelligence Quotient” and offers information with regard to an individual’s learning styles and overall ability. More specifically, it is a prediction for how well a student can perform in school. There are several areas of focus with regard to an IQ. An IQ test considers how well a person responds verbally and visually, as well as an individual’s assessment of memory and timed pressure.

How does a child qualify for SPED?
In the current system their are 13 possible verifications. Each verification has various expectations for qualification indicated in Rule 51, a guideline for special education programs. Typically an evaluation must be completed before a child can qualify for services, with the child’s performance falling considerably below their peers.

 

Special Education Departments

What is Specified Learning Disability (SLD)?
A specified learning disability, also commonly referred to as SLD, comprises approximately more than half of the special education programs in the US. It is by far the largest group of children with disabilities served in the school setting. According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education ACT (IDEA) “LD is a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations, including such conditions as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and development aphasia.” In other words, the observed academic problems are greater than what might be expected based on the child’s intellectual ability. Children with LD are performing below their ability, intelligence or potential. Currently, SLD is defined by the state of Nebraska as a discrepancy between a child’s measured ability and academic performance. This split must be 20 points or more. Due to upcoming changes with regard to Response to Intervention (see link), this process of verification is subject to change.

What tests will typically be administered by the school psychologist?
Most often, the school psychologist will administer tests to measure a child’s IQ and academic achievement. This information will be utilized in conjunction with developmental history, a review of the cumulative folders, observations of the child in the classroom and in social settings, and teacher and parent information. Depending on the circumstances of the child, additional measures of behavioral and/or personality tests may be administered. (See Psychological Evaluations: What Every Parent Should Know).

 

Questions? Comments? Please email Scott or Tracey.